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9 Tips for Science Website User Experience

Woman browsing the web on her laptop

 

You have on average 10 seconds to impress your website visitors. Not a second will be wasted, unfortunately. Within the quest to form an excellent website experience – by addressing its look, feel, and usefulness – here are 10 website elements that will be tweaked immediately to improve the science website’s user experience and keep that user engaged along with your content for extended.

These tips are relevant for both large and little science-based organizations with the aim of constructing the science website easy and pleasing to use.

1. IMPROVE LOAD TIME

Slow loading websites and sites are the web’s biggest sin. It’s the primary element of your website that a visitor interacts with and is the first chance to make that seamless user experience. Optimal page load time is between 1.5 to three seconds – anything higher puts your conversions in danger because people won’t stay around to attend for content to load. If it takes longer than 3 seconds to load, Google states that 53% of users will leave your science website. Reduce content, optimize images, enable browser caching or increase your server/hosting capacity if your site is slow. Most web services such as GoDaddy have this feature. You can also view these GoDaddy alternatives for other hosting options.

2. IDENTIFY YOUR 404S

It is likely your website has been live for a variety of years and now it’s also likely that your organization has created web content for webinars, news, and other events that have now expired. If these pages were simply deleted after the event, it’s likely that referring links will point to a broken 404 page. 404 pages aren’t an excellent example of an excellent user experience. Identify your 404s and founded redirects to other pages on your science website (or create a 404 page that has a mess of options to induce back on track) in order that user journeys on your website don’t come to a halt.

3. MAKE SURE THE SITE IS RESPONSIVE

Once again, a highly obvious recommendation but there are still science websites that aren’t mobile responsive. These poorly designed websites don’t provide an optimal user experience and InVision state that 85% think that an organization’s website should provide a stronger experience on mobile than on desktop. Of course, we operate within B2B markets where the bulk of our visitors will come from desktops. But this can be no excuse with 2020 on the horizon. Your science website should operate effectively across mobile and tablet devices, if not, a redesign is so as.

4. SIMPLIFY THE NAVIGATION

The bounce rate on your homepage could be a great indication of how well your science website and subsequent content are structured. If the bounce rate is high (50% and upwards), it should be time to rethink your navigation. Often, website visitors find an organization’s website complicated to navigate, leading to a bounce that visitors never return. To avoid this, look to create your navigational options as simple as possible and avoid cramming long lists of pages onto menus. Categorize the content on your science website and offer them on sections of the website in several ways to assist ensure a positive user experience.

 

ALSO READ: Scientists Should Have A Website

 

5. MAKE ALL WRITTEN CONTENT DIGESTIBLE

Easy to navigate, read and understand are what all website text should be. No matter the topic area, this is often actually easy to realize just by editing the presentation of current content. Increasing white space on a page increases user attention by 20%, according to Crazy Egg. If your science website text doesn’t sit on a white background, change it as soon as possible. Also, take care to use titles and subtitles for your text sections and chop up the paragraphs into short sections. Bullet points also are your friend, together with any presentation styles that present information to visitors quickly and efficiently.

6. KEEP WEB CONTENT DESIGNS CONSISTENT

Once website visitors have familiarised themselves along with your unique method of content presentation, the other presentation forms (that conflict) will have an adverse effect on the user experience. You are doing not want website visitors to question whether or not they are still on your science website after clicking through to a distinct section. Ensure your pages are all designed to follow a standard pattern. Templates are often accustomed keep pages consistent; just ensure these templates also are according to your brand guidelines.

7. HYPERLINKS

Science websites getting wrong with Hyperlinks are another website element I often see. Of course, it’s necessary to incorporate similar content on sites. Should a visitor want to search out more a particular topic, he or she will be able to do so easily by clicking on links without trying to find it. But make sure that the hyperlinked text is clearly identifiable – underlined or via blue text is the commonest approach that users will understand.

8. KEEP A WATCH ON SEO

Search engine optimization (SEO) may not come as a priority to marketers operating within the pharmaceutical, bioscience, and other technical organizations. But if you’re following SEO best practices together with your website design, you may be adhering to Google’s guidance, which can not only talk over with the most effective possible user experience practices but also will make sure you have the most effective possible chance of attracting more organic visitors to your website. Poorly designed science websites won’t rank highly on Google because they’re usually not designed well.

9. SECURITY

Every website, irrespective of whether the website is brochureware or e-commerce naturally, must be secure. A secure website will almost certainly safeguard an exceptional browsing experience for the user – no visitor should be invited to an internet site that won’t secure. Attaining a security seal is additionally advisable, from the SSL certificate to the payment assurances on key conversion pages to the opt-in forms in terms of GDPR. DesignAdvisor found that 20% say that security concerns are the most reason they don’t buy and take action from mobile or e-commerce websites.