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Three Science Experiments With Salt | See It On YouTube

Whether ground or coarse, with salt, you not only add flavor to the soup. The crystals can do a lot more. The workshop presents you with three amazing experiments you can try at home. You can also download these videos using YouTube to MP4 converter so that you can show them to your class or lectures.

Clean Old Coins In A Flash | YouTube Phill Wyatt Outdoors

Fill a glass with vinegar. Pour in table salt until the bottom is covered about 0.5 cm. Stir everything vigorously so that the salt dissolves completely. Put your dirty coins in the solution and take them out after a few minutes. Then rub it dry with the kitchen paper. And? It’s sparkling clean!

What happened? The “dirt” on the coins is mostly oxidized metal. The acid in the salt-vinegar compound removes the metal oxide. The cleaning effect can be seen particularly well with the smaller brown coins, as they have a copper jacket.

But be careful: the salt and vinegar bath not only makes the coins shiny but also loses a tiny bit of mass every time you rub off the oxidized metal. Not that your clean money has disappeared at some point …

How electrifying! This is how you separate salt and pepper

Separate Salt and Pepper With Electrifying Charge | YouTube Child’s Play Nursery

Scatter salt and pepper. Rub the balloon vigorously against the wool fabric a few times. Now guide the balloon slowly just over the spices without touching them. The pepper jumps on the balloon and sticks there.

What happened? The balloon gets an electrostatic charge through the friction on the fabric. This makes it really attractive to the spices. Since peppers are lighter than crumbs of salt, the first thing they are attracted to and stick to the balloon is. After a while, the charge will decrease again. You can simply freshen it up by rubbing it again.

Light From Salt and Water | YouTube HD Channel

Technically, salt and water solution like a battery – but without acid or other toxic substances. Two electrode rods made of different metals react differently with the electrolytes in saltwater. Therefore, salt in water actually is an electric conductor that produces electric charges to light your bulb.